"The Fappening" is hilariously appropriate

Hey, look who's back with yet another indignantly self-righteous piece about how horrible, terrible, no good, very bad, doubleplus ungood men are!

OK, admittedly, that describes virtually every single one of Ms. Sanghani's articles, but this one squarely takes aim at the guy who hacked the iCloud:
There are 60-odd naked pictures of Jennifer Lawrence circulating around the internet. No matter how much people like Lena Dunham beg the world not to look at the photos, we all know that thousands, probably millions, are staring at them right now. [Didact: That is an absolute certainty. Rule 34, luv.] 
But what’s far worse is that I think we can safely assume that some aren’t just ‘looking’ at these private, nude photographs - they’re masturbating to them. [Didact: Uh, and you thought that guys would be passing them around while enjoying a spot of tea and biscuits, discussing Match of the Day? We're men. It's what we do. You have a boyfriend, right? Didn't you know this???]
It’s a truly horrible thought, and one of many that Lawrence is probably grappling with right now (although I hope she's off having a dry martini somewhere hot), but a quick glance at Reddit, the social media site where many of the pictures have surfaced, proves that it’s happening.
There’s already a subreddit (a thread) dedicated to “those leaked photographs”, with comments so graphic, sexist and plain nasty that I hope Lawrence, or any of the other female celebrities included in this hack, never see them. 
The name of this discussion? 'The Fappening'. [Didact: +500 internetz to whoever came up with that one.]
 For those who aren’t familiar with the term, it is a mixture of ‘the happening’ – quite simply, what’s going on – and the slang term ‘fapping,’ meaning masturbation. The portmanteau ‘The Fappening’ seems to have first been used in the title of the subreddit when it was created yesterday. Already it has more than 100,000 ‘Fappeners’. [Didact: OK, I'll admit, that's kind of disturbing.] 
Its popularity has now led to the entire hacking scandal, where more than 100 A-listers are alleged to have been targeted, to become widely referred to as ‘The Fappening.’ The phrase is trending on Google, it’s being used by well-known websites, and it even has its own hashtag: #fappening2014. 
 I shouldn’t really be surprised. We’ve been attaching catchy monikers to serious situations ever since Watergate. Since then we’ve had countless others - including more recently and closer to home - Plebgate, where we all forgot about the fact that police officers were being accused of lying and just focused on 'the drama'. On a lighter note in the last week we’ve had The Bincident’ in the Great British Bake Off, and earlier this year, a global campaign to raise money for charity was summed up with the hashtag #NoMakeUpSelfie. 
It’s become second nature for us to not just describe a situation in 140 characters, but to reduce it to a hashtag. That’s exactly what’s happening here with ‘The Fappening’, but unlike #NoMakeUpSelfie or #EverydaySexism, it’s not really doing anything positive. Instead, it’s reminding us of the dirty reality of people sexually objectifying Lawrence et al without their consent, let alone their knowledge. 
#Fappening2014 isn’t even raising awareness about the true impact that hacking can have - it’s just providing a way for people to easily make stupid jokes, derogatory comments and shame the women involved.
All right, Madame Schnozz, do try not to get your nose out of joint. It would take the NHS's entire discretionary budget to put it back in line, after all, and that's money that your socialist health care system can't spare.

Now, on to business.

If there were real identity theft involved- credit card information, Social Security numbers, bank records, or other sensitive personal details- then Ms. Sanghani's outrageously outrageous outrage might actually have some meaning.

That is not what happened.


What happened was that a bunch of women with more looks (and in Kate Upton's very specific case, bewbs) than brains decided to stick naked pictures of themselves onto a data storage system where the boilerplate legal language specifically says that Apple holds no responsibility for the data on its servers, and that the end user assumes all risk and liability for posting said material onto that service:
“Content” means any information that may be generated or encountered through use of the Service, such as data files, device characteristics, written text, software, music, graphics, photographs, images, sounds, videos, messages and any other like materials. You understand that all Content, whether publicly posted or privately transmitted on the Service is the sole responsibility of the person from whom such Content originated. This means that you, and not Apple, are solely responsible for any Content you upload, download, post, email, transmit, store or otherwise make available through your use of the Service. You understand that by using the Service you may encounter Content that you may find offensive, indecent, or objectionable, and that you may expose others to Content that they may find objectionable. Apple does not control the Content posted via the Service, nor does it guarantee the accuracy, integrity or quality of such Content. You understand and agree that your use of the Service and any Content is solely at your own risk.
I also find it rather remarkable that Ms. Sanghani seems to think that the women in question here are blameless for what happened. They are not.

If you are a young woman and you willingly participate in the production of, shall we say, material of questionable morality, and you happen to be over the age of 18, then it's on you to accept the consequences.

A woman who takes nude pictures of herself, or creates sex tapes of herself with another man (or men), and then digitises that material and posts it somewhere, has to share a portion of the responsibility for engaging in that behaviour.

If said young woman had exercised the restraint and good sense needed to understand that such material does have a non-zero probability of escaping out into the real world, then such material would likely not have existed in the first place. And a lot of embarrassment, humiliation, and tears would have been avoided.

Now, so we're very clear, there is nothing whatsoever wrong with attractive young women- and also Kirsten Dunst, though your stomach may need an Alka-Seltzer in her snaggle-toothed case- taking naked pictures of themselves. It is a time-honoured and quite righteous tradition for young dumb women to take pictures of, shall we say, questionable taste of themselves in, um, er, compromising situations.

There is rather a great deal wrong with posting said risque material on the interwebz and then expecting that it will somehow remain completely private at all times.

And of course, expecting that attractive young women under the age of 30, who have lived in the public eye for virtually their entire adult lives, would understand what moderation and chastity means these days, is a bit much. It's like expecting a chimpanzee to build a space station with nothing more than a banana and a hammer.

Cloud-based storage systems are a great way of sharing certain documents that can't be sent via email- my family and I do it all the time with holiday photos, for instance. But if you have material that you'd rather keep private, use some common bloody sense and keep it off the cloud.

Stealing personal information and data is a crime, as it should be. But in the case of The Fappening (my God, that's obscenely funny), there is guilt to go around.

Youngsters like Jennifer Lawrence and Kate Upton- and it depresses me greatly to note that they're even younger relative to me than my own sister- need to wake up, and quickly, to the fact that the joys of the digital age come with a very real and very definite price.

Comments

  1. "Cloud-based storage systems are a great way of sharing certain documents that can't be sent via email- my family and I do it all the time with holiday photos, for instance. But if you have material that you'd rather keep private, use some common bloody sense and keep it off the cloud.

    Stealing personal information and data is a crime, as it should be. But in the case of The Fappening (my God, that's obscenely funny), there is guilt to go around."


    I've never seen anything like it. Not in all my 42 years. Not the naked photos thing, the finger pointing. I most certainly understand that stealing data is perceived as a crime. But in all seriousness, how can any of these yahoos be truly running around talking about fuckin' privacy? It'd be nice to have but damn, common bloody sense, as you said above, that's what's missing. I'll never cease to be amazed at how many words humans will spill in waste in order to point the finger.

    "#Fappening2014 isn’t even raising awareness about the true impact that hacking can have - it’s just providing a way for people to easily make stupid jokes, derogatory comments and shame the women involved."

    And rightly so the woman involved should be shamed. Do you remember a few years back, when the Obama Camp overused the phrase, "Teachable moment" and soon, all the sycophants were following suit? Well, here's a "teachable moment" but these twits ain't getting it. I don't care for hacking yet here are real-world consequences for real world stupidity, a chance for all the fans of these celebrities to learn their own lesson. But instead, as usual, it's being twisted as somehow being someone else's fault.



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Teachable moment" is right- and amazingly, even President Jackass can come up with a sensible phrase once in a blue moon.

      Unfortunately, there is simply no teaching some people.

      I swear, things like this are proof positive that God has a very dry sense of humour.

      Delete

Post a Comment

NO ANONYMOUS COMMENTS. Anonymous comments will be deleted.

Popular Posts