Female porn addiction


Now this is one "disease" that I would have absolutely no problem helping its (straight and female) sufferers to cure: 
Women are just as capable of being ‘addicted’ to porn as men[Didact: well duh. It's not like that godawful Fifty Shades mommy-porn nonsense is being marketed to men, after all.] It's official. A new German sex study has confirmed what I have long suspected and that heavy use of pornography could make some of us “hypersexual” - a personality disorder that involves spending excessive time engaged in sexual fantasies. We love a dopamine hit as much as the next fella. After all, we’re human, and our brains are wired to find novelty exciting, irrespective of our genitals or gender.

I love porn, and ever since I began researching it for my work, I’ve become increasingly seduced by its gushing celebration of the human body in all its variety; its capacity for pleasure beyond the bounds of moral, missionary stricture; and the fantasy outlet it provides. Far from believing that porn is responsible for our social and intimate decay, I am zealous about its capacity to cheer up our stress-rich, time-poor, care-worn lives. Whatever the fantasy you’d like to explore, there’s a porn clip out there for you. If you’re female, you might just need to spend a little more time riffling through the racks, so to speak. 
I was never much of a dabbler as a teen. Instead, as a keen reader, I smuggled my mum’s copies of the Kama Sutra [Didact: contrary to popular perception, the Kama Sutra is not JUST a sex manual, it's actually a guide to being a capable and skilled prince.] and Nancy Friday's My Secret Garden into my bedroom, stuffing them down the gap between the radiator and my single bed, dazzled by the variety of human sexual experience that sex education and Hollywood 12 ratings had not prepared me for. 
Later, I was far more interested in having sex than watching it, particularly, in front of mirrors. In my late teens, after a debilitating few years battling with anorexia, my sex drive had all but evaporated, [Didact: so this chick is an emotionally damaged sex addict. How original...] and when I ventured back into the online fold at university, I didn’t do it for pleasure. I was going through what I like to call my High Morbid Feminist phase, and searching for evidence of objectification and exploitation.

“Porn is the separation of the parts from the person,” read one feminist text I loved to quote in my modern literary theory class. [Didact: ... and people actually take feminists seriously?] But when I wrote my dissertation on Nabokov’s Lolita and the feminist dissections of it, something shifted. How could these theorists be riled about a fantasy depiction where the victim is a character? And wasn’t video porn full of characters too? I decided to go back to the online stuff.

Soon, I was logging on several times a week. It was high respite from the high-minded literary journalism sphere into which I was trying to break. There is some deeply erotic and artistic material out there, featuring men as beautiful as the women, and made by the likes of Erika Lust, Ms Naughty, and Pandora Blake. But I also love the raw, ragged, mainstream videos that populate the tube sites. I love kinky porn, queer porn, and decidedly hetero stuff, even more than girl-on-girl. And I love to imagine being THAT guy. [Didact: A reasonably fit chick that likes girl-on-girl porn? Gentlemen, the line forms outside...] 
Now, as a 30-year-old female boxing nut, I’m probably in possession of a higher sex drive - and the energy reserves to power it - than many of male peers. But once in a relationship, I’m enthusiastically monogamous. Without porn, there’d definitely be a sexual energy deficit I’d have to discharge somewhere else.
Personally I find this very amusing, not disturbing. If you know anything about women, you know that they are just as avid consumers of smut as men are- they just consume it very differently, that's all.

Contrary to popular perception, women, and not men, are far more likely to engage in, shall we say, sexual practices of a questionable nature. There's nothing particularly wrong with this, in my personal opinion- what goes on behind closed doors is the business of those participating and no one else's, as long as no one is harmed involuntarily.

But let's not pretend that feminists who protest against the objectification of women in porn are virtuous in any way. As the author of this particularly silly article makes clear, feminists are perhaps the least coherent and least sensible of all critics of pornography- all you have to do is look at that whole Belle Knox case to see just how ridiculous the feminist double-standard is when it comes to what is, and is not, objectification of women in pornography.

Let women watch all the porn that they want. Let them enjoy it too. What they do with it is their business and no one else's. But let's not fool ourselves into thinking that women are somehow more virtuous and more clean-minded than men, because that's just a load of pants.

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