Fat-shaming is entirely justified


Maria Kang, the MILF who pissed off a bunch of land whales and shoggoths by asking a very simple question, landed herself in yet more hot water recently by pointing out that fatassitude is a sign of poor health (WARNING: you will require eye bleach for some of the photos in that article):
An exercise-loving mother-of-three who has continually made headlines with her 'fat shaming' views, has now stirred further controversy by suggesting people who 'look overweight' are clearly unhealthy.
Maria Kang, 32, from Sacramento, California, appeared on CNN this Saturday along with Chrystal Bougon, a plus-size lingerie store owner who she slammed last week for launching a 'selfie' photo campaign promoting 'real beauty'.  
During a live TV showdown between the two women, Ms Kang insisted that she was not a fat-shamer, but said the ladies depicted in Ms Bougon's photo gallery 'are not how real women look like or should look like.'...
Ms Bougon, 45, who sells underwear in size 14 and up at her San Jose-based store, Curvy Girl Lingerie, also voiced her outrage after hearing what Ms Kang had to say.
'You can't tell whether or not I work out. You can't tell how healthy I am by looking at a photo of me. You just can't,' she responded.
On her website Ms Bougon states that she has been 'curvy' since she was in Third grade and now makes it her mission to make other plus-size women feel 'sexy and confident' in their own skin.
Whatever this Ms. Bourginon is smoking is pretty damn strong. She's not "curvy". She's fat, end of story. 

Ladies, a word of advice- these days, if you call yourself "curvy", you're not fooling anyone other than yourself for even a minute. Guys like me have seen enough of "curvy" women by now to know damn well that it's basically code for "gravitational singularity with my own event horizon". For instance, after I was done with that article, I stumbled across another one regarding plus-size model Robin Lawley- and promptly averted my eyes when I saw just how tubby that so-called "model" is. Turns out that it doesn't matter how nice your face is- and Robin Lawley does have a decent face (when caked in make-up and with extremely well-managed lighting); if you're fat, you still look awful in a bikini.

Maria Kang is completely right to call out fat women for being fat. They need to hear it and they need to act upon it. My own sister, for instance, is at least half a head shorter than me, but she's a good 10kg heavier than me- and while I'm in the best shape I've ever been in thanks to a relentless and punishing really awesome regime of powerlifting, martial arts, and the best of good eating, she's still fat and out of shape despite being nearly 10 years younger than me. I know for a fact that it affects her health and her confidence- and it makes her less feminine. Half the reason that she is as liberal as she tends to be is because of the rampant you-go-girlism that fat girls surround themselves in order to justify their complete lack of real attractiveness- and make no mistake, if you met my sister in person you would immediately find yourself thinking that if she lost 30lbs, she would be really pretty. (Yes, the problem is that bad.)

Fat girls everywhere need to understand something very important: for women, femininity is and will always be their most important asset. Men don't particularly care for a woman's brains or career achievements; you could have a PhD in neuroscience, but if you can't make us feel comfortable and happy in your presence, you're not worth our time. And if you look like the back of a bus, then it doesn't matter how nice or sweet you might be- you're not going to inspire anything other than a feeling of mild dread in us, as in "I'm worried that if I take away that third helping of ice cream, I'm going to find teeth marks in my forearm tomorrow morning...".

Do we expect every woman to look like a Victoria's Secret model? While that would be nice, it's not realistic. We are ruled by genetics; in my case, I have Asian genetics stretching back something like four generations that will mean that I will almost surely never have that ripped six-pack look (despite the fact that I can out-lift most guys who do have six-packs). There is, however, no excuse whatsoever for being fat. Anyone who looks at me standing next to my sister will often find it difficult to believe that we're related, for instance, yet she and I were raised with similar ideas about food and both of us have come to accept the Paleo approach to food and the Primal approach to exercising- but only one of us has results to show for it, and that would be the one who stopped making excuses and put in the hard work required to get rid of the unnecessary poundage.

The world needs more women like Maria Kang (her rather grating California accent aside). Good for her. And good for any woman who chooses her looks and femininity over the corpulent lies that society tries to feed her.

Comments

  1. To be fair to Lawley, she's not obese, she does have "curves" but not in the way most fat girls think "curves" has meaning, and while she's not rocking that bikini, she doesn't look completely unfortunate in it. A different style or type of bathing suit might flatter her figure much better than a bikini clearly suited for someone with much different proportions.

    This is something I've noticed about big girls. The type of clothing you wear can either make you look horrid, or highlight your enticing traits while downplaying the bad ones (assuming, of course, you're working on eradicating or minimizing those bad aspects).

    I'm a big girl, not by nature, but circumstance and pregnancy and lack of discipline to get it all back together after the kids were born. I have found what works for me and am going with it, losing about 2 lbs. per week and dressing to emphasize what I find good about my figure. I do have curves, when I'm thinner - larger hip flare relative to natural waist and chest proportions, small but there breasts, and a tendency to being well-toned when I focus on lifting heavy things but not on cutting to male-level body fat (imo that's neither healthy nor appropriate for women). right now, the "curves" are just lumps and I hate them, but you can't raze in a day what took years to build and patience is key.

    I can respect that larger women need a clothing outlet to serve them. I'm not talking about women who are obese despite being capable of achieving a smaller body size. I'm related to several women on my dad's side who are all between 5'11" and 6'2" (all five of my dad's sisters are tall women) and who have that Teutonic curvy thing going for them. True Valkyries, they are. I wouldn't consider any of them fat, but they do have trouble finding clothing in your average store, so from that anecdotal perspective I can sympathize with the needs of larger women having good fashion available to them.

    But they are outliers. What Curvy Girl Lingerie, &c. do for women is give them an OPT OUT of acceptable norms. Give a person a place to flee, and shame has no meaning. There is no need for self-improvement when a person can take cover with a group who validates every imagined wrong "society" has placed upon them.

    Don't want to live in "society" or by its norms? Then don't, but don't be butthurt about it when you can't rejoin the group and be accepted merely because you "bucked the trend" and decided to live outside of its bounds.

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    1. The type of clothing you wear can either make you look horrid, or highlight your enticing traits while downplaying the bad ones (assuming, of course, you're working on eradicating or minimizing those bad aspects).

      Yes. Women who know how to dress will always find a good way to show off the best parts of their bodies while minimising the effects of the less flattering aspects. And that is all well and good. The problem I have is with women who are downright FAT- in other words, women who betray a fundamental lack of discipline and self-respect- who then insist that they are owed something by the rest of us.

      Don't want to live in "society" or by its norms? Then don't, but don't be butthurt about it when you can't rejoin the group and be accepted merely because you "bucked the trend" and decided to live outside of its bounds.

      Quite.

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  2. Women like Chrystal Bougon put a target on their own backs. I have never made fun of a fat girl in my life. Most of the time I have sympathy for them. It is difficult to change your lifestyle and focus on self improvement. Those women who do set out to change themselves I hold in high esteem. Self improvement takes a lot of time when you have 20+ pounds to lose. I don't find it acceptable to mock them.

    However, people like Bougon open themselves up for criticism. I heard about her delusions about two weeks ago. I saw on Buzzfeed a featured Huffington Post piece. Oh, I was pissed when I read it. The article was to promote anti fat shaming. Something I do not agree with. I don't believe in being nasty and mean to another person. But I sure as hell will not support them. The article cleverly was saying they were promoting "regular women, not photoshopped". A campaign that typically I would like to see more often. Then I looked at the photos that were being promoted and her actually website. The photo campaign specified sizes 14 plus only.

    That is nothing more than fat promotion. Most of the women who had commented on her website were obese women got quite huffy at the criticism. There were a good fraction of women that were under size 12 that were fat shaming the campaign. I agreed with those women. When I heard "regular" women I thought of sizes anywhere from a size 4- size 10. I don't expect average to men plus size.

    I rarely endorse the ideal of supermodels to be representative for feminine beauty. Most of the time that is because they are very thin. However, when it comes to lingerie, it is safe to say we would prefer looking at models. Most women are not built to be model thin. I am a size 6 and that is the lowest size I will ever look my best in. I also eat Paleo and I lift weights.I could force myself into a lower size but I would be very weak. That is not my personal ideal. There is very few representations on my own body type. But I am not about to insult thinner women by saying their not regular women. Nor will I endorse size 14 as normal women. Because as you stated, and other bloggers have stated, feminine beauty is within every woman's control.

    BTW, I recently started another blog about these very ideas. I couldn't really find a way to include them into timeofcalamity.com. However, I felt the need for some time to still discuss some of these types of topics and have the other side of femininity promoted. The bog is more of a Red Pill blog like Vox but for women. Dealing with femininity instead masculinity.The same ideas of self improvement and social issues. Any ideas for topics?

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    1. I rarely endorse the ideal of supermodels to be representative for feminine beauty. Most of the time that is because they are very thin. However, when it comes to lingerie, it is safe to say we would prefer looking at models. Most women are not built to be model thin.

      Agreed. Supermodels are not, and will never be, representative of the average woman, just as professional powerlifters, tennis players, football players (I should note that when I write "football", I mean real football, not what you Americans call football), and rugby players are not and will never be representative of the average man.

      Fat is ugly regardless of sex. It's uglier on women, simply because of the way women's bodies are built and the way they handle excess fat; men can get away with being fatter than women can, for longer, for a variety of reasons, mostly having to do with the fact that a man's masculinity comes from more than his outward physical appearance. For women, however, femininity starts with appearance and continues onward from there. A woman who is undisciplined enough to be fat, in an age when women can, like you, go Paleo and lose weight relatively easily, is not someone to follow as a role model.

      BTW, I recently started another blog about these very ideas. I couldn't really find a way to include them into timeofcalamity.com. However, I felt the need for some time to still discuss some of these types of topics and have the other side of femininity promoted. The bog is more of a Red Pill blog like Vox but for women. Dealing with femininity instead masculinity.The same ideas of self improvement and social issues. Any ideas for topics?

      Now that is a worthy undertaking indeed. I do hope you succeed with this. Vox is the best at what he does for a number of reasons, not least of which is his extraordinary intellect and his ability to write very clearly and very precisely. Since your new blog will deal with issues of self-improvement and social mores for women, I would suggest that you start with simple ideas for female fitness and diet. From there, move on to literature- Vox has been doing a lot to take apart "pink SF" over the last few weeks and I would very much like to see a woman's perspective on the same subject. I would also like to know your views on women in the workplace, simply because so few women really understand that they can be good co-workers without acting like alpha males (which they never manage to pull off very well).

      If you would like to put up a guest post here, then by all means please feel free to send me material via email. If I think it's worth posting, I will do so, unedited and unaltered, you have my word on this.

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